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3rd Party Remote Call Monitoring to Leverage Twitter



By Susan J. Campbell, TMCnet Contributing Editor
December 19, 2016


How well have you incorporated social media into your customer service activities? In an omni-channel customer engagement world, customers are starting to demand instant attention from the companies with which they do business. Those who are able to accommodate are leading the pack. Those who are not may be failing to protect the customer base. The use of 3rd party remote call monitoring can help, but let’s look at Twitter (News - Alert) specifically.



According to a recent Business2Community post, the potential for using Twitter for customer service really hasn’t taken hold. The potential is certainly there, but brands either don’t understand what to do or haven’t set aside the budget or the people to get it done. In 2014, only 30 percent of brands used Twitter for customer service, a number that hasn’t increased much since that time.

Perhaps even sadder is the fact that, of those brands that are using Twitter, less than 10 percent actually address more than 70 percent of customer queries. What these brands fail to recognize is that their customers that are using these channels will take advantage of the reach to complain about the brands that make them mad. Their friends will take notice and use that as a referral to avoid that brand. Those companies that aren’t jumping into these conversations are missing the opportunity to make it right.

Simply deciding to interact via Twitter isn’t enough, however. You need to have a strategy and monitored activity. Just like your 3rd party remote call monitoring is done on the customer service line, your Twitter interactions should not be handled on the original Twitter account. Customers may be hesitant to lodge complaints on this engagement doorway and the brand won’t be able to see customer history to know best how to satisfy the customer.

You’ll also notice through 3rd party remote call monitoring how your customers react to certain scripts and interactions. You’ll want to humanize your Twitter responses, but also follow the best practices you learn from monitoring opportunities. It’s also a good idea to put keyword monitoring tools in place so you know what to look for and when. This will help you stay on top of interactions and identify problems quickly.

In short, if you want to use Twitter for customer service, get your ducks in a row first. You’ll then be able to reap the benefits. 




Edited by Alicia Young

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