New Report Uncovers Current State of Latin American Telecom Industry

By Luke Bellos, Editor, TMCnet  |  October 08, 2021

Market research firm Frost & Sullivan (News - Alert) recently released  a new study titled “Latin America in the Post-pandemic World” which closely examines the technological challenges that businesses within the region are currently facing today in regards to communications. The research also highlights how Latin American organizations are attempting to transform existing infrastructure, and offers a deep analysis into the current and future state of business communications.

The study, which took place between November and December of 2020, compiles survey results from 468 IT and telecom decision-makers in the region. According to the results, 70% of respondents state that they have plans to have, at least, 25% of their workforce in home environments. Interestingly, only 50% of survey participants stated they have supplied employees with remote equipment, forcing employees to utilize personal equipment for business tasks. The overall research appears to demonstrate that many participants anticipate adapting in the coming years, but currently aren’t equipped to fully embrace hybrid/remote environments

The details of this report also highlight one of the more concerning aspects of the recent migration to the digital world-lack of security. It appears that Latin American executives have comparable feelings to other business leaders in regards to technological adoption, but are falling short in providing employees with secure equipment. It’s common knowledge that cybercrime is on the rise, and partially due to the fact that hackers are exploiting the lax security measures of underprepared businesses.

Latin American business leaders are certainly moving in the right direction in terms of technological advancement. Yet they must consider the dire consequences of an unsecure hybrid workforce, and should focus their investments on offering employees the most advanced equipment available.




Edited by Maurice Nagle