BPA Featured Article

What AI Requires to Meet Its Promise



By Paula Bernier, Executive Editor, TMC
August 07, 2018


The opportunities for artificial intelligence to enhance productivity and influence the future of work seem to be limitless. One place businesses are already implementing AI is in the call center.




Artificial intelligence and machine learning can be employed to entirely take over specific work. They are particularly well suited to handle repetitive tasks.

AI and ML can also help humans in the call center by serving up the information they require when they and the callers they’re working to help need data fast. Plus, AI and NLP can be used to capture and analyze calls to check for compliance.

All that can lead to better business and customer outcomes.

But professional services firm Genpact (News - Alert) in its new report reminds us that for AI to meet its promise, it will require more than just the adoption of new technology. Genpact says it will also require organizations to:

• dedicate resources and funding to AI;

• encourage innovation among middle managers;

• focus on process not function; and

• reskill people to foster a learning culture.

A survey by Genpact and research firm Fortune Knowledge Group also produced the following data:

• 82 percent of those surveyed plan to implement AI in the next three years;

• 79 percent of AI leaders say employees will be comfortable working with robots by 2020; and

• 68 percent says it’s important that senior management understand the benefits of implementing AI.

“While almost all executives have plans for AI in the next three years, only a fraction are reskilling employees to deal with today’s technology disruption and prepare for what is ahead,” says N. V. ‘Tiger’ Tyagarajan, president and CEO of Genpact. “The study also reveals what AI leaders are doing to make AI work. With the right approach and foundations in place—resourcing, training, process orientation, and a culture of innovation—they keep their organizations relevant and ahead of the field.”




Edited by Maurice Nagle

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